A Passion for Community Service

The family law attorneys at Ward Potter LLC, share a passion for community service. Each attorney spends time outside of the office serving individuals and organizations in and around the Wichita community. Previous community service projects include leading a mentorship project with Hamilton Middle School. In 2012, Ward Potter (previously Ward Law Offices, LLC), was honored with the Wichita Public Schools Board of Education Good Apple Award for excellence in service to students. In addition to their collective community service work, each attorney at Ward Potter serves in various ways individually in Wichita and across Kansas.
Below is a sampling of some of the organizations our attorneys and staff work with to improve our community and help the people in our community in need of not only legal services but help in other areas of life.

Junior League of Wichita

Lynn Ward is not only the Managing Partner of Ward Potter LLC. She is a Past President of the Junior League of Wichita. Lynn and the staff of Ward Potter were pleased to support the Junior League of Wichita in their fight against child abuse by supporting the Junior League of Wichita’s 16th Annual Holiday Galleria, a shopping experience for the whole family October 3-6, 2019 at Century II in downtown Wichita.

The 3rd Annual Show Pride in Your Ride Car Show was an unforgettable evening! With the support of our guests and donors we raised over $2400 for OK Elementary School and Black Traditional Elementary! Special thanks to the following businesses who donated wonderful items for the raffle or provided support of our event: Hereford House, Plastic Surgery Center, Hall’s Culligan, South Central Kansas Mustang Club, Joe’s Car Wash, USD 259, Big Tool Store, and Janet Evans.

On Friday, March 29th Ward Potter LLC and the Wichita Thunder joined forces to support the Guadalupe Clinic at Intrust Bank Arena.

The 2018 Show Pride in Your Ride event was held on Friday, September 7. All proceeds from the 2018 event benefited Pando. The Pando Initiative has been successfully connecting with more than 200,000 students in area schools since 1990. Their core model focuses on individual students who are struggling with school and life. They position a dedicated staff member inside partner schools in Wichita, Derby and Haysville public schools.

On September 15, 2017 Ward Law Offices hosted the first annual Show Pride In Your Ride car show. Show Pride In Your Ride was an informal, non-judged car show for friends, neighbors and colleagues of Ward Law Offices, LLC. During the event, Ward Law partnered with officials from United Methodist Open Door who held a raffle. Car Show attendees were able to purchase tickets for a chance to win a Richard Petty Driving Experience at Kansas Speedway. All proceeds from the evening’s raffle benefited Open Door. The focus of Open Door is to meet the basic needs of people in poverty. Their Homeless Resource Center, at 402 E. 2nd Street, is a daytime assistance center for the homeless, where individuals receive case management, a daily meal, access to showers, laundry and storage facilities, and mail service.

Passion Projects – Two Lives at a Time & The Refugee/Immigrant Outreach Team

Lynn Ward, Board of Directors of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers and Stephen Blaylock, fellow of the Kansas Chapter of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers present a check to Laura Roddy, President of Junior League of Wichita; and Jessica Williams, Junior League of Wichita grant writing  chair. Ward was presenting to Roddy a check for $5000 from the AAML Foundation for the JLW Two Lives at a Time project. The Junior League of Wichita and the Wichita Children’s Home will help teen moms develop crucial life skills, including how to build healthy relationships and effective parenting practices.

The Five Tenets: Tenet Four - Honesty

 

Couple of disclaimers: 1) I tend to put a lot of stock in honesty, and 2) I do not tend to put a lot of stock in “my truth.” The first was how I was raised, and the second is my own opinion. Nature and nurture.

To start, I think we need to be sure we talk about the difference between being honest and being truthful. We should always try to be both, but the truth of something can be different than how we are honest. Case in point: I can honestly believe I am right about a certain subject, but that does not mean my feeling is truthful. Sometimes the difference can get lost. Sometimes the “truth” is something we have told ourselves so many times and for so long the actual truth gets lost. We need to be mindful of understanding what we see as the truth may contradict, sometimes drastically, from what the other person sees as the truth.

That is where honesty comes in. I think honesty is based more upon feelings and beliefs than upon facts. Honesty centers upon how I am feeling, reacting, and communicating with a person at a given time, and based upon a given subject. Truth factors into the conversation, but if I am angry, happy, or sad about something the fact it may not be true does not cancel those feelings. I might seem more than a little irrational, and it is at that point I should probably take a break from communicating, but I am being honest about my feelings in the communication.

The other side of honesty is when I am communicating with someone, if I want the communication to remain positive and productive, then I need to recognize their honesty might not be truth. I need to recognize the communication for what it is and consider my response carefully. If I am trying to understand their position and communicate my position back to them, then I need to be sure to recognize their feelings. Granted, that assumes the person is genuinely communicating with me, and I can understand the communication, but that burden falls upon both of us. Both parties must be honest if progress is to occur.

With honesty being my goal, I think it helps to take a moment and organize my thoughts. Maybe I am truly angry, and if so, while anger is a necessary emotion and probably honest, I might not be in the best frame of mind to convey what I am thinking. In my experience at least, yelling at the person I am communicating with and making sure they understand I am angry is not productive. Usually, they disengage or get angry back and make it very clear why I am wrong. Because as I have said, I cannot remember a smart thing I said when I was angry. On those rare occasions that I get angry I tend to make as much sense as algebra (please don’t get me started).

So, I take a moment, organize my thoughts, and feel like I can honestly communicate. Or maybe I need another moment, or hour, or day or week. That part really is important: if I do not feel ready to communicate using these tenets then it would be best if I ask for more time. To be fair, I should not use this as a delay tactic, and if I agreed to discuss a certain topic at a certain time, then I need to be prepared. But if I truly need some additional time to organize my thoughts and be able to communicate honestly about an issue then I should ask for that time. On the other hand, if that time is asked of me, then I should give it if possible.

Assuming I have those thoughts organized and am ready to communicate honestly, then what I find to be helpful is acknowledging what I am feeling by simply starting the statement with “I feel” and moving forward. It probably should not be “I feel you are being a jerk”, but something more like “I am feeling anxious because of how we are communicating.” Taking the focus off the other person, stating my feeling, accepting my part in the communication, and honestly conveying what is going on inside my head is the first step.

The second step might be a response saying something like “Thank you for sharing that with me. For my side, I am feeling upset because of this situation as well.”, and back and forth it goes. For me, the frustrating part of these types of communications is at first it seems as though nothing is really being said. Maybe so. But maybe the other person needs to convey those feelings to really, honestly communicate. Maybe I did not understand what those feelings were, and if not, how can I understand their point of view? If we really take a moment to think about it, isn’t that the point of almost all miscommunications? If we only took a few (hundred) steps back and started off by identifying the source of the emotion, perhaps we could work towards a solution.

I know, I know, that seems ideal, and possibly even unrealistic. After all, I think the times we are truly honest is when we first establish trust. If we do not trust the person then the likelihood of open, honest communication is probably slim. And trust is hard. Maybe one of the hardest things to develop or re-establish. But we must start somewhere. Somebody must take the first step. Somebody has to start by saying “this is the idea I am trying to convey, and why it is important to me.” When that happens, I think one of two responses occurs, both of which are positive.

First, the other person will recognize the honesty and trust, and reciprocate. Second, the person will not recognize the honesty or trust, the response will be combative, and I can practice my other four tenets. I start to build a good communication path, or I identify a closed path. I think both are better than not being honest. But again, I put a lot of stock in honesty. I would even go as far as saying that without it you cannot have real communication, and without real communication nothing will truly be solved. Thanks for reading.

 


Tony A. Potter is a Member of Ward Potter LLC, where he uses his experiences in general civil, trial, and appellate practice to represent clients. Tony received his Juris Doctorate from Washburn School of Law in 1994 and has been continually licensed to practice law in Kansas since 1995. Tony is a member of the Kansas Bar Association, the Wichita Bar Association, the Northwest Kansas Bar Association, and the Chair of the Wichita Bar Association Family Law Committee. His commitment to his clients was also recognized in 2018 when he was acknowledged as an “AV” attorney, peer-rated for high professional achievement by Martindale-Hubbell, and he enjoys a 10.0 rating from the Avvo attorney website. Contact Tony

Ward Potter LLC is a family law firm located in Wichita, Kansas. Ward Potter handles divorce, child custody, parenting time, prenuptial and postnuptial agreements, visitation by grandparents, and paternity cases. The firm also provides litigation alternatives such as collaborative family law, mediation, and arbitration. The mission of Ward Potter LLC is to guide clients through changes in their families with empathy, excellence, and expertise. We strive to calm chaos and focus on the resolution, not the battle.

345 N. Riverview Ste 120 | Wichita, KS 67203
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A Passion for Community Service

The family law attorneys at Ward Potter LLC, share a passion for community service. Each attorney spends time outside of the office serving individuals and organizations in and around the Wichita community. Previous community service projects include leading a mentorship project with Hamilton Middle School. In 2012, Ward Potter (previously Ward Law Offices, LLC), was honored with the Wichita Public Schools Board of Education Good Apple Award for excellence in service to students. In addition to their collective community service work, each attorney at Ward Potter serves in various ways individually in Wichita and across Kansas.
Below is a sampling of some of the organizations our attorneys and staff work with to improve our community and help the people in our community in need of not only legal services but help in other areas of life.

Junior League of Wichita

Lynn Ward is not only the Managing Partner of Ward Potter LLC. She is a Past President of the Junior League of Wichita. Lynn and the staff of Ward Potter were pleased to support the Junior League of Wichita in their fight against child abuse by supporting the Junior League of Wichita’s 16th Annual Holiday Galleria, a shopping experience for the whole family October 3-6, 2019 at Century II in downtown Wichita.

The 3rd Annual Show Pride in Your Ride Car Show was an unforgettable evening! With the support of our guests and donors we raised over $2400 for OK Elementary School and Black Traditional Elementary! Special thanks to the following businesses who donated wonderful items for the raffle or provided support of our event: Hereford House, Plastic Surgery Center, Hall’s Culligan, South Central Kansas Mustang Club, Joe’s Car Wash, USD 259, Big Tool Store, and Janet Evans.

On Friday, March 29th Ward Potter LLC and the Wichita Thunder joined forces to support the Guadalupe Clinic at Intrust Bank Arena.

The 2018 Show Pride in Your Ride event was held on Friday, September 7. All proceeds from the 2018 event benefited Pando. The Pando Initiative has been successfully connecting with more than 200,000 students in area schools since 1990. Their core model focuses on individual students who are struggling with school and life. They position a dedicated staff member inside partner schools in Wichita, Derby and Haysville public schools.

On September 15, 2017 Ward Law Offices hosted the first annual Show Pride In Your Ride car show. Show Pride In Your Ride was an informal, non-judged car show for friends, neighbors and colleagues of Ward Law Offices, LLC. During the event, Ward Law partnered with officials from United Methodist Open Door who held a raffle. Car Show attendees were able to purchase tickets for a chance to win a Richard Petty Driving Experience at Kansas Speedway. All proceeds from the evening’s raffle benefited Open Door. The focus of Open Door is to meet the basic needs of people in poverty. Their Homeless Resource Center, at 402 E. 2nd Street, is a daytime assistance center for the homeless, where individuals receive case management, a daily meal, access to showers, laundry and storage facilities, and mail service.

Passion Projects – Two Lives at a Time & The Refugee/Immigrant Outreach Team

Lynn Ward, Board of Directors of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers and Stephen Blaylock, fellow of the Kansas Chapter of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers present a check to Laura Roddy, President of Junior League of Wichita; and Jessica Williams, Junior League of Wichita grant writing  chair. Ward was presenting to Roddy a check for $5000 from the AAML Foundation for the JLW Two Lives at a Time project. The Junior League of Wichita and the Wichita Children’s Home will help teen moms develop crucial life skills, including how to build healthy relationships and effective parenting practices.

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